Breaking the Cycle of Teenage Pregnancy

images“You always tell me you want to break the cycle of teenage pregnancy and poverty that has been going on in your family for generations,” I mentioned to Rochelle at the beginning of our last meeting.  She had been successfully working to improve her financial situation since we had begun our interviews a year and a half ago; last April she got hired by a good company with opportunities for advancement, but it had been quite a while since we had discussed the teenage pregnancy situation that had helped cause her poverty.   Teenage pregnancy was the norm in her extended family; how did she plan on preventing the cycle from repeating in her children’s generation?  Her eldest daughter, Kalinda, is now 11.  I had thought she was 12 because she is tall and looks older, but she won’t turn 12 until the summer.  Rochelle has not talked to Kalinda about sex yet.  “ I think maybe 7th grade is a good time,” she had told me about a year ago.  Kalinda is now in 6th grade; she mixes with 7th and 8th graders in her junior high school; Rochelle’s eldest sister got pregnant in junior high at 13.  “She is around older girls and I’m sure they are discussing sex,” I said.  “If your sister can get pregnant at 13, it could happen to your daughter just as well.  What do you think prevents young girls from going down that path?  What will prevent your daughter from becoming pregnant?”  I asked.

“Well, I think the parent needs to be home or to have the kids supervised when you aren’t there,” Rochelle said.  “When I was growing up there was no adult around.  My sisters brought boys home and I saw all that.  My mother brought men home all the time as well.  We weren’t supervised at all.  When I got pregnant I just went into denial and told no one.  Never went to the doctor.  But then, of course, I had to go to the hospital when I went into labor. Being in denial didn’t keep the baby from coming.”  I told Rochelle that supervision was needed but it took more than that to prevent teen pregnancies.  “Did you ever think about how a child would change your life or about how much money and effort is involved in raising a child?”  I asked her.  “No,” she said, “I was totally unprepared.”

“If Kalinda has a child as a teenager it will also become your problem,” I suggested.  “It will be a huge change for Kalinda, but it will also be a huge change for you because that baby will be in your house.  It is your responsibility to share all this with your daughter; to tell her how hard your life became because of a pregnancy at 16.  She didn’t make it hard for you, but being 16 at the time did.  You need to talk to her about all this and to talk to her about sex and contraception as well.  Kids grow up fast.  You grew up fast.  You need to find the time to talk to her; the sooner you do it the better for both of you,” I said emphatically.  I knew she had a lot going on, but without her moving forward in the education of her daughter, the same cycle will repeat and repeat sooner than she may think.

“Did you have any future plans for your life when you were in high school?” I asked Rochelle.  At her job, during the recent interview for a promotion, she had been asked what her five-year plan was.  No one had ever asked her that before.  I told her it was a common job interview question.  Luckily she was successful in her interview and is now promoted to a first level supervisor over cashiers.  She starts training this week.  The company has asked her to elaborate in writing about various things, one being her goals for five years from now regardless of whether she is still with the company.  “If you had had long term goals in your life do you think you might have thought more seriously about preventing a pregnancy when you were 16?” I asked.  “Yes, I love my kids, but my life stopped when I got pregnant,” she told me.  “You need Kalinda to have goals and to see what can happen to them if she becomes a teenage, single parent,” I said.  “I do,” Rochelle said, “I sure do.”

 

 

Interviewing for a Promotion

images“I think it went well, but seven other people are interviewing for the job, too,” Rochelle told me.  She had applied for a part-time hourly management position at her store.  They would keep her as a full-time employee, and she would work half-time as a manager over the cashiers and half-time at her normal cashier position.  At first I was concerned she would not keep her full-time job with benefits, but she asked and they said all would be well.  “We don’t do our people that way,” her manager told her.  Basically Rochelle would be monitoring the lunches and breaks of the other cashiers and handling problems at the check out stations.  “I won’t be real upset if I don’t get it,” she told me.  “I still have my full-time job, and I haven’t been here very long.”  She called me after her interview and said she thought it had gone well

At first I thought I would wait until the results of this job application had been decided before I made another post.  Rochelle will find out the results later this week.  But this is a major event in Rochelle’s life.  She has never been able to apply for advancement before.  She is saving a bit of money and has the possibility of moving up in her job.  I sure hope she gets the position, but if not, eventually she will move forward if she sticks with it.  I think we will get back to a discussion about teen pregnancy in our next interview.  I’ve got real concerns about her 12 year old daughter.  Rochelle has yet to talk to her about sex, and the girl seems to have friends who are already involved with boyfriends and either potentially or actually sexually active. Several of her Facebook “friends” say they are “in a relationship.”  At 12.  Rochelle and I have discussed this before, but nothing seems to be happening on the sex ed front, either at home or at school.  I think it is time to get back to the original subject of this blog, which is the problems of single black mothers.  Her 12 year old daughter may be one soon, and it would be a good thing if Rochelle can prevent it from happening.

The chances are far from good for Rochelle’s daughter.   In 2011, the last date for which I found conclusive figures, 72% of the African American mothers who gave birth in the United States were unmarried.  (So were 35% of the white mothers and 53% of the Hispanic mothers.)  Another way of looking at this is to note that in the same year (2011), only 51% of all Americans had ever been married (compared to 72% in 1960).  And if we look at the stats by race, we see that in 2011, only 30 of all African Americans had ever been married.   Fewer Americans are getting married now than ever before, and more babies are being born to unmarried mothers than ever before, and these two trends are most pronounced among African Americans. Just statistically it is possible to say that Rochelle’s daughter will probably be an unmarried mother, and that she will probably never marry.  If we add to this the facts that most of Rochelle’s female relatives are single mothers, that most of her daughter’s cousins and friends are or soon will be single mothers, the picture looks grim, indeed.  It is simply the norm for poor, African American females to become single mothers, and to do so when they are quite young and have no job skills.  Rochelle’s daughter does not do well in school, either academically or socially.  She is classified as a “slow learner,” and she has trouble controlling her temper.  School does not offer her a rewarding experience in any way.  She has no obvious future to protect.  It seems inevitable that she will be a mother sooner rather than later, especially if Rochelle does not have a serious talk with her about sex..

 

 

Rochelle Begins Saving Money

images“Here’s another $8,” Rochelle said, holding out her hand.  We had talked about trying to save money now that she was working full-time.  She started by giving me $20 from her January interview money two weeks ago, then added $5 more the next week and now had added another $8.  Right now she puts it in a piggy bank at my house that must be broken to remove the money.  It is an old Mexican folk art bank in my Mexican folk art collection, and I have no desire to ruin the bank in order to remove the money.  She isn’t earning any interest, but there is really no interest earned in a bank savings account these days anyway.   In three weeks Rochelle has saved $33!  “And I’m not missing the money,” Rochelle said. I had hoped she would see it that way.

“Does the grocery store have a profit sharing or 401K plan?” I asked.  I knew they did and thought it was supposed to be a fairly good one.  Rochelle didn’t know the answer, but we went to my computer and looked it up.  After she has worked full-time for one year she can join their 401K plan.  The company will contribute $1.63 for every $1 she saves for up to 2% of her wages.  The webpage then showed what a $10/hour employee would save over 25 years saving at a rate of 5%.  Rochelle will not reach her year anniversary until next November, but I wanted her to be aware of what savings can do.  401K plans need to be monitored to truly benefit the employee, but I can teach her that later.  Right now she is seeing a light at the end of a tunnel; I wanted her to see the possibility of even more light.

I remember Rochelle asking me what I spent money on when we both worked at the department store.  She rarely saw me spend money during store sales, though most of the other employees did.  The employees usually bought things on their department store charge card to get a discount, but then didn’t pay off the charge bill which carried a 24.99% interest rate.  If I did buy something, I always bought it with my store charge card but paid it off in the next transaction.  That way I got the discount but didn’t risk having to pay an interest rate.  I was not that smart when I was Rochelle’s age, however.  I too didn’t pay my charge cards in full then.  Rochelle is learning about money and debt.  “I wish I knew all this earlier,” she told me.  I wish I had learned it earlier too.  She seems excited to have money in the bank and to think about the future.  Having good things to mention about Rochelle’s life journey is refreshing .  Everything, however, is still very precarious. Nothing has changed with childcare, nor transportation, nor with her mother’s health.  A problem with any of these things will bring on another crisis. But for right now, Rochelle is able to think about the future.

A Corner Turned?

images“I have no stress and the holidays were good,” Rochelle told me on January 2nd.  “This year I’m going to focus on my health and on my career with the grocery store.”

I had never heard her use the word “career” when talking about any job.  The store knows she wants to advance, and she has already been trained in various areas of its operation.  When this training was first offered to her she didn’t want to do it.  Initially they wanted her to learn how to demonstrate food; she felt this was a lower position than she currently held.  It was, however, higher pay.  I told her the more she learned about the company, the more valuable she would be to them.  Later they wanted to teach her how to run their gas station operation.  Now she does both in addition to acting as cashier, and she enjoys it.  She also attended, on her own time, a class on the various methods for advancement within the company.   She has now worked at the store for 8 months.  “I want to learn all I can about the company before I try for advancement,” she told me.  They only take 10 people a year into their management school and Rochelle knows she isn’t ready.  The company does, however, offer classes to learn about its organization and operations, and that is how Rochelle wants to proceed.  Rochelle is thinking ahead and thinking things through for the first time since I have been interviewing her.  Of course, this is the first time she has ever had a job with any kind of future.

Rochelle is not even close to being out of poverty, but she is on a better course.  Her car will still be causing problems, but things are definitely better than they were a year ago.  I asked her what she thought.  “I think I’m on the right track finally,” she told me.

I have not posted for the last month or so, though I did interview Rochelle weekly.  I guess I was taking a needed break as well.  I will continue to interview Rochelle for the next 6 months and then we shall see where this blog goes.  I’m going to leave this post short because there is no need to elaborate.  All is not going to be smooth sailing, but Rochelle just may have turned a corner.  Again my fingers are crossed.